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Shawnhalu

Standard Member
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About Shawnhalu

  • Rank
    Standard Member
  • Birthday 07/31/1984

General Info

  • Location
    Asia
  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Drifting
  • Car Type
    Nissan Silvia
  • Car Model
    S15
  • Occupation
    Rookie Mechanic
  1. Hi everyone sorry for bring up a old thread but i needed some help on this, I have a Nissan Silvia S15 (200SX) been with S13 (5speed), S14 (5speed) & S15 (6speed) gearbox. Recently i have got a chance to get either a Z33 or Z34 due to a mate have both car that going to be scrapped soon. There is a few question i have been researching but getting kind of mixed answer which i like to clear off. Before i start buying the conversion kit 1. Z33 or Z34 a better choice? (some saying Z34 bellhousing is shorter than Z33?) 2. Mazworx SRVQ Bellhousing after cutting the bell housing of stock. the gap inbetween can it be seal up or can i cut actually shorter off so that the gap will be closed? 3. does it need hammering of tunnel. (i read some said that mazworx adapter does not really need hammering) 4. Can i retain S15 Dual mass flywheel & clutch? 5. Is there any NVH if convert to the above mention transmission? 6. would like external slave pump just like stock s15 6 speed 7. what is with the synchro match & speedo thing as i am not quite sure on this section? i am so sorry that i have to came to check with you as i cant get a definite answer on this part.
  2. Hi BigFist hows your Z33 conversion so far?
  3. Sard Jet Pump Killer

    Hi I need some help here. I have bought the Sard Jet Pump Killer for a S15. I know it create better venturi effect but i am not sure which way to install it to have a better setup. 1. Use Sard general setup that drop the jet pump adaptor into the tank where the pump is and with a line to another side 2. Attach the jet pump to the Fuel tank cap and uses the stock external return and (a line at the bottom corner of the silvia tank, which i assume is sucking fuel from the side where the pump is not located) to the connector of the fuel tank cap where the jet pump is attached below. anyone have an idea?
  4. KTS vs CUSCO vs KAZAMA

    Thanks Guys for all the info
  5. KTS vs CUSCO vs KAZAMA

    btw i have some cusco arms already on the car. which have done i guess more than 60000km i dont get any noise from it. but just very rusty on the turnable parts. can it still be use or might just change it. everytime when it need to be adjust, the mechanic have to use lot of wd40 and a tremedous of strength before it can be lossen and turn.
  6. KTS vs CUSCO vs KAZAMA

    what are the guard & caster brace you talking bout? wow ikeya formula is expensive haha
  7. KTS vs CUSCO vs KAZAMA

    Any reason why? Genuine question,as I'm planning on getting all my arms through gktech. I've had multiple sets of bearings fail in extremely short periods of time. I had the tie rod ends fail with less than 2k kms use (even with 'qa1' brand bearings) and camber arms that failed in about 8k km use on a daily that saw no abuse whatsoever. I have not used the v3 arms, just the previous versions. The billet arms are bulky, and the fittings are overly big and seize up. The threads are also quite coarse / large meaning you get more adjustment with less turns, most other quality brands come with fine threads, much easier to work with and easier to undo lock nuts. I don't mean to talk shit about his brand, we all know he's a stand up bloke who fixes problems. Spl use titanium locking nuts and tubing, so light AF and strong. Welds are also very good. Most importantly the rose joints are quality (i believe gktech now uses qa1 bearings, so should be a bit better than before). I'd love to see spl (or another quality producer) come out with a rubber / poly rod end, that would be a perfect package. I'm still not sold on hard race, being a Chinese produced brand. roberto. any opinion on the kazama vs cusco? ps i also have a question. which of this yashio core support guard & the cusco tension bar support is better or rather have some good in it. as the yashio tie from power brace to chassis, cusco tie from power brace left to right.
  8. KTS vs CUSCO vs KAZAMA

    KTS REAR SUSPENSION MEMBER BRACE KIT - GT-R SILVIA SKYLINE this item is not for a silvia s15 right? i dont see any of this arms around silvia. unless one look like the traction arms
  9. I need some opinion on KTS vs CUSCO vs KAZAMA handling parts. My arm are very old already thinking of swapping all of it. but i have seen this KTS price being cheap but i have see no review on the item itself. anyone here can give me some help? thanks
  10. Guys i need help on these rings. Do you guys think is it overkill to use Titanium Rings on a street car running over 360 horses or the rings that come with tomei piston is more than enough? i already have the piston on hand and saw they have the titanium coated top rings. does it also mean the bottom rings is the same as the ring that came along with the piston?
  11. Subframe, Diff, Arms Bushes

    Thanks pmod One more thing is what roberto bring up. Is there any difference with a pop out or flat surface in all bushes around the arms, diff and especially the subframe, like what i have mark in the photo?
  12. Timing chain & Oil Pump

    Ok Thanks mate
  13. Subframe, Diff, Arms Bushes

    For a static subframe bush that doesn't move at all, yes, they're better for fitment. With the poly bonded to the sleave and the sleave press-fitted to the tube, you'll have the most controlled positioning for the bush. It's not recommended for the simple reason that poly bushes bonded to a metal sleave wouldn't actually work, as control arms have to move. The metal sleave can't rotate due to being a press fit, and poly is so much stiffer than rubber that there's virtually no flex. The outcome would be control arms that can't move and subsequently get bent out of shape, or bushes that snap the moment you hit a bump. I have never seen a poly control arm bush that wasn't a slip-in variety that requires lubrication in order to rotate inside the arm's bush housing. Understand that static mounts like subframe bushes don't have the same requirements as rotating mounts like control arms. Over the years I've heard enough "rough ride, squeaks all day" comments about all of the poly bushes from all of the brands, whether it be Nolathane, Energy Suspension, Whiteline, Superpro, etc. To make it clear, I was specifically referring to subframe bushes. Whiteline offer a press-in type subframe bush, but Nolathane does not, so it doesn't matter who owns the company as the product range is different between them. Save yourself headaches and just buy the Whiteline sleaved bush if you want something stiffer than vulcanised rubber. Sure it costs more, but the last thing you want is to have to drop your subframe to fix issues should any crop up. Remember, the poor man pays twice. I don't think you understand what the actual issue with poly bushes is. All poly bushes from all manufacturers require constant re-greasing, otherwise they squeak like a mouse. A grease knurling will help retain grease for longer, extending maintenance intervals, but it WILL eventually have to be re-greased, which is a tedious headache nobody needs. I've even heard of racers of oldschool cars (where poly bushes and oem rubber are the only things on the market for their cars) changing back to oem rubber because they got so sick of dealing with poly bushes. People say a lot of things, but the reality is that all poly bushes are stiff, all poly bushes squeak without constant maintenance, all brands offer mostly the same thing, and all poly control arm bushes are a headache. I only use poly bushes for parts that do NOT move, meaning subframe, rack and swaybar. For everything else, rubber or vulcanised rubber on a street car. haha yeah i understand the meaning of poor man pay twice. that is why i want to make sure it is a one shot job. the rest is just maintenance. so if for the arm i get nismo reinforced bush does that mean vulcanized rubber? man you explain real well.
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